Saint Louis School

Applications for the 2017-18 school year are now available
Social Science » Social Science

Social Science

World Geography Grade 6 (year)
This course introduces concepts and ideas designed to study physical and cultural diversity toward the goal of an increased understanding of our world. Students learn various geographical concepts and explore major world regions while focusing on human - environment interaction. Specific topics for study include physical geography, population, culture, economy and social issues within each region.
 
Introduction to U.S. History Grade 7 (year)
This introduction to the colorful legacy of the United States begins with the earliest settlers and cultures rooted in North America. The core of the class is based on crucial time periods. These units highlight keystone events that shaped our country and society, such as: Colonial Society, the American Revolution, the Constitution, and the Age of Reform. We close the year with the Civil War and Reconstruction. The historical content also serves as a medium for assessing student reading and comprehension skills.
 
United States Government Grade 8 (year)
This course will focus on US History after the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on governmental theory, institutions, practices, and civic participation.
 
Hawaiian History Grade 11 (semester)
(Offered to members of the Class of 2016 only)
This course provides in-depth study of the history and culture of the Hawaiian people, with focus on their past, present, and future as it shaped their individual and collective realities. Content scope ranges from the post-western contact and the monarchy of Hawai’i, to the current issues of Hawai’i, including the Akaka Bill and OHA ceded lands settlement. Included are units on the political, economic, and social history of Hawai‘i. Students will develop an understanding of the basic social and historical concepts shaping current issues. 
 
Geography and History of Hawaii Grade 9 (year)
Hawaiian Geography - This course examines the geography and the human makeup of Hawai’i, as well as the causes and changes of the transformation of the area. The conceptual framework is built around the 5 themes of geography: location/place, environment, region, interaction, and movement. The course takes a critical look at the issues affecting Hawai’i from creation and formation of the islands to pre-western contact.
Hawaiian History - This course provides in-depth study of the history and culture of the Hawaiian people, with focus on their past, present, and future as it shaped their individual and collective realities. Content scope ranges from the post-western contact and the monarchy of Hawai’i, to the current issues of Hawai’i, including the Akaka Bill and OHA ceded lands settlement. Included are units on the political, economic, and
social history of Hawai‘i. Students will develop an understanding of the basic social and historical concepts shaping current issues.
 
World History Grades 10 (year)
This course covers the intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social and economic history of Europe, Asia and the Americas. Students examine significant events in world history in order to gain a clear understanding of our world at the present time. The course encompasses the period from the Renaissance though the World Wars and continues into major movements to the present.
 
United States History Grade 11 (year)
This is a standard survey course of the important events, people, places and ideals of American History. The course will challenge students to recognize the complexity of human existence and the reality of human diversity, both within the nation and in a globalized society. Students will be encouraged to make connections between the events of the past, the contemporary world and themselves in order to define their own place in our American society.
 
United States Government ** Grades 11-12 (semester)
This course focuses on political theory, the foundations of American democratic institutions and the criminal justice system. Specific topics of study include the federal system, Constitutional law, civil rights and liberties.
 
Economics ** Grades 11-12 (semester)
This course introduces students to the principles of economics. Students study the basic problem of scarcity and how each society deals with it. Topics include supply and demand, production factors, marketing, labor, role of government, money and banking, a study of Hawaii’s economy and its role in global economics.  *This course qualifies as fulfillment of 1/2 credit of the social science graduation requirement.
 
Advanced Placement World History ** Grades 10-12 (year)
The AP World History course provides a way to understand history and a foundation from which to view the complexities of today’s world. Its emphasis on encounters and interactions provides a framework that is especially important. AP World History course is shaped by the six themes and the “habits of mind” that are outlined in the Course Description provided by the College Board. These overarching themes and the habits of mind foster critical thinking and encourage students to develop their own abilities and to truly be a part of the learning process.  Additional AP Exam and materials fee of $125.00 (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.
 
Advanced Placement United States History ** Grade 11 (year)
This course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. Students learn to assess historical materials and weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students with a strong background in writing and analytical skills are encouraged to enroll.  Additional AP Exam and materials fee of $125.00 (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.
 
Advanced Placement United States Government ** Grades 11-12 (year)
Students are expected to take a year-end ETS (Educational Testing Service) Exam that may fulfill college level requirements. This course addresses all areas of the American political system from democratic political theory to the study of the federal system. Students focus on Constitutional law, civil rights and liberties, the bureaucracy, as well as the study of electoral campaigns and political parties. As a college level course, students are expected to complete numerous reading and writing assignments. Classes are lecture and discussion driven. Students with a strong background in writing and analytical skills are encouraged to enroll.  Additional AP Exam and materials fee of $125.00 (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.
 
Advanced Placement Psychology ** Grade 12 (1 year)
The aim of this course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses. Students learn some of the explorations and discoveries made by psychologists over the centuries. They also assess the differing approached adopted by psychologists, including the biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and socio-cultural perspectives. Specific topics may include methodology, behaviorism, neuroscience, sensation and perception, developmental
psychology, and intelligence and psychological testing. Additional AP Exam and materials fee of $125.00 (does not include textbook and workbook costs). Students are required to take the AP Exam in May in order to receive a weighted grade for this class.